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Goshawks, Porcupines and Wildflowers

I’ve got a new microscope and am having fun bringing flower samples home to view them.  Its a lot easier than using a hand lens.  My method is simple:  a small plastic baggie with a paper tower.  If I find samples, I wet the towel and wrap the plants.  They’ll stay viable for days until I remember to extract them from my daypack.

While looking for wildflowers, I had some unusual wildlife encounters.  Last week I disturbed a grizzly in his day bed, but he was a good bear and just ran off.  But today I was ‘mobbed’ by a Goshawk whose nest was nearby.  She was quite aggressive, dive-bombing me over and over again on my way up the trail.  But on the return, she was even more pissy and came quite close–I suppose thinking I hadn’t learned my lesson the first time.

Goshawk nest

Goshawk nest

Goshawk resting during dive-bombing me

Goshawk resting during dive-bombing me

I also saw my first porcupine.  Koda was a little ways up the trail from me peering around the corner.  He stopped and was wagging his tail.  I  knew something was up. Thankfully, he decided to just stay put instead of investigate.  I think he learned his lesson when he saw the grizzly bear last week.  I was able to capture the porc waddling away.

Porcupine waddling away

Porcupine waddling away

Here are the wildflowers for today’s post:
Sand Lily

Sand Lily

Twisted stalk

Twisted stalk

Unidentified mountain flower

Unidentified mountain flower

Pedicularis

Pedicularis

Valerian

Valerian

Woodland star

Woodland star

Unusual to see a white pasque flower

Unusual to see a white pasque flower

Round leaved Alumroot

Round leaved Alumroot

Western meadowrue male flowers

Western meadowrue male flowers

Musineon tenufolium/ Wild Parsley

Musineon tenufolium/ Wild Parsley

 

Meadow of Larkspur and Woodland star

Meadow of Larkspur and Woodland star

Common twinpod

Common twinpod
Nineleaf bisuitroot

Nineleaf bisuitroot

Subalpine fir new cones

Subalpine fir new cones

Sedum sp.

Sedum sp.

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One Response

  1. What a great outing you had!!! I have never seen a Goshawk, if you haven’t mentioned having this nest year you to Chuck, I am sure he would be interested. Your way of keeping your flower samples fresh, we use in our kitchen. Cooks Illustrated recommends wrapping fresh herbs in a damp paper towel, then storing in the refrigerator. I have been doing this for a couple of years now. I also place these in a plastic container, otherwise the towels dry out too fast. It is just amazing how much longer fresh thyme, rosemary, etc. keeps. Even fresh basil keeps a little longer when stored this way. Loved the photos attached with this blog entry.

    Like

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